New footage of ‘Tsar Bomba’, history’s most powerful nuke

The RDS-220 hydrogen bomb goes off. Source: YouTube

This post was originally published on October 31, 2018. I'm republishing it today after Rosatom, the Russian nuclear energy corporation, released 40 minutes of previously classified footage of RDS-220's explosion on August 28, 2020 (embedded below). This is a minute-long excerpt by Reuters showing the explosion. Fifty-seven years ago on October 30, the Soviets detonated…

Why scientists should read more

The amount of communicative effort to describe the fact of a ball being thrown is vanishingly low. It's as simple as saying, "X threw the ball." It takes a bit more effort to describe how an internal combustion engine works – especially if you're writing for readers who have no idea how thermodynamics works. However,…

Ayurveda is not a science – but what does that mean?

Five bowls containing different spices rest on a dark coloured table, seen from above.

This post has benefited immensely with inputs from Om Prasad. Calling something 'not a science' has become a pejorative, an insult. You say Ayurveda is not a science and suddenly, its loudest supporters demand to know what the problem is, what your problem is, and that you can go fuck yourself. But Ayurveda is not…

India’s missing research papers

If you're looking for a quantification (although you shouldn't) of the extent to which science is being conducted by press releases in India at the moment, consider the following list of studies. The papers for none of them have been published – as preprints or 'post-prints' – even as the people behind them, including many…

The matter of a journal’s reputation

Apparently (and surprisingly) The Telegraph didn’t allow Dinesh Thakur to respond to an article by Biocon employee Sundar Ramanan, in which Ramanan deems Thakur’s article about the claims to efficacy of the Biocon drug Itolizumab not being backed by enough data to have received the DCGI’s approval to be inaccurate. Even notwithstanding The Telegraph‘s policy on how rebuttals are…

An Upanishadic lesson for modern science?

Do the Bhagavad Gita and the Upanishads lack the "baggage of biography" – to borrow Amit Chaudhuri's words – because we don't know who the authors, outside of the mythology, are or – as Chaudhuri writes in a new essay – do these texts carry more weight than their authors themselves because Eastern Philosophy privileged…